Tags

, , , , , , , ,

Little children always take everything seriously. I know that from experience, because as a little kid, I believed everything I was told. Though I know that in any reality, that wouldn’t be a good thing. And it wasn’t. Now, I guess I will ‘serenade’ you with another ridiculous childhood story; one of which is about the most ridiculous and absurd thing I have ever, and I shall repeat, EVER, written. Well, I guess there is no point of writing this paragraph right here anymore, so, I shall press enter, but before I go, enjoy! (If possible).

When I was 4 years old, there was time when I was going through a long phase, and during that phase, I was obsessed with cars. They were my life. My oxygen. my everything. But that changed my vision on the universe. Everything was a race track to me, and I was told that my imagination molds my life. So what I thought that meant was, whatever I generally thought existed in the real world. And no-one knew this, but it would later grow in to a problem. Anyways, one crisp Autumn morning, oh wait, lets just skip the details. At least 6 years ago, I can remember one time when my parents were going to go to brunch at a fancy restaurant. Naturally, they couldn’t bring a psychotic 4-year-old with them, with his trusty troublesome 3-year-old brother, so my mom drove us to my Nanny’s house to stay for a while. Let me rephrase that; my mom was driving us there. Me, a car obsessed little boy, could never, ever, go on a car ride without doing something evil, and devilish. Ever.

So, no-one was aware of their impending doom. I guess that made everyone think that they would have a perfectly fine car ride. So we drove. Again, lets skip some of the boring details while driving. After about 10 minutes, I noticed something that made me nearly throw up. The little girl sat smugly in the passenger seat in the car next to us, but when I saw that, that little girl with attitude, something inside me snapped. My eyes were opened. I knew what life was. I was face to face, with the meaning. Everything was a racetrack. My racer senses kicked in, but that meant trouble. Yet again, I looked at the little girl, but I saw what seemed to be hidden in plain sight before: She was passing us. If she passed us, we would lose the race (yes, I am aware that I should have seen a doctor or something for thinking like this) ! I looked at the smug girl, and everything seemed to be in slow motion. Her arm hung out of the window, and that made her look like some thug. She turned her head, and gave me a smile that instantly told me she was gloating. Her teeth seemed to glow up, in sort of a triumphant way, but just for a second. And when that happened, she did a mean hair whip, and looked away. Then, whoever was at the wheel stepped on the gas pedal, and sped ahead of us.

Featured image

I had to act fast, though I wasn’t driving the car. I assumed my mom had noticed, but, by the looks of it, she didn’t. She didn’t drive any faster, in fact, to me, it felt much slower than before. Time slowed down, like one of the heartbreaking scenes when someone falls in to the bubbling pit of lava. At that moment, that is what I felt like. A person falling in to a bubbling pit of lava. But, I then realized, there was one more option, but I now regret that choice. I didn’t realize that it could be bad, because I was desperate and time was running out, also because I was four years old. But I did it. I screamed, but I was so shaken by the intensity that I made no sense. I didn’t speak English, nor any other language. Long story short, my mom never got the message, and we lost the race. Woo hoo.

Featured image

Advertisements